Aligning the Conscious and Subconscious

Posted by Vince Poscente on Tue, Nov 27, 2018 @ 01:22 PM

Transcript Reprint from an Interview with Dr. Diane Hamilton:

Aligning The Conscious And Subconscious with Vince Poscente

(Audio Link Here)

Screen Shot 2018-11-27 at 2.15.33 PM

I am with Vince Poscente who is rated by Meeting Professionals as the Top Ten Motivational Speaker. He is a New York Times bestselling author who wrote the international phenomenon The Ant and the Elephant: Leadership For the Self. He’s an Olympian, could be a comedian and he has a lot of energy and personality. It’s nice to have you here, Vince.

Thank you. I appreciate it. It’s good to be with you.

You’re obviously an entertaining speaker. I want to know how you got to this level of success. Can you give a little background?

You mentioned that I was an Olympian. A bit of that story is I didn’t start ski racing until I was 26 years old and ended up being in the gold medal round at the Olympic Games a few years later. A few years after my 26th birthday to be in the Olympic Games involved a specific strategy. While I was racing, I thought, “I was ranked tenth in the world after a couple of years. I’ve put together a specific mental training program to work well. I could win this thing,” and then I didn’t. Here I was placed fifteenth in the Olympic Games. I lost. There was no demand for my speaking business but many months after the Olympics, their speaker canceled. On the last minute, they said, “Would you come and speak to our group of 90 networking people?” Four people independently came up after and said, “You’ve got to do this for a living.”

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If somebody said, “You got to see this movie,” you’d go, “Yes,” but if four people independently say, “You’ve got to see this movie,” you would go, “What is it about? What do I have to see?” I paid attention and then grew my business. It was very much a standing start. There was no momentum at the beginning because I was in the Olympics. There are a lot of gold medalists getting their phone ringing off the hook saying, “Would you speak to us?” but to be in demand to have that referral network where people say, “Would you speak to our group?” that came from improving as a speaker. Much the same way I did it as an athlete.

You did it because you’re only one of four people on the planet to be inducted into the USA and Canadian Speaker Hall of Fame. That’s saying something. You’re a New York Times bestselling author of seven books too. You’re a busy guy. What was the most difficult book for you to write off all of those?

Always the most recent one, they’re horrible. I’ve never given birth obviously. The gestation period in a book gets more and more difficult each time. I’m working on one right now. I won’t tell you the title but it’s a sequel to The Ant and the Elephantwhich is a parable about the conscious and subconscious mind. I’m working on that right now. They’re all like your kids. You get out there and you can’t pick a favorite.

I found what you were talking about the ant walking one direction and then the elephant walking the other. Can you share that a little bit because I liked the subconscious versus conscious discussion you had with that?

I went to a presentation by a guy named Dr. Lee Pulos. You know when you’re sitting there and then light bulbs go off? This guy said, “In a second of time, your conscious mind is processing with 2,000 neurons.” Right now, you’re listening to what I have to say. You lead by saying, “I’m very funny and I haven’t been funny,” and all sorts of things you’re thinking of consciously with 2,000 neurons every second. In the same second, the subconscious mind is processing with four billion neurons. The ratio between the conscious and subconscious mind when Pulo said is if you took a golf ball and put it on top of the Houston Astrodome. That would be the ratio of the conscious and subconscious mind. Mathematically, I took that down to what if you put an ant on the back of an elephant? There’s a more alliteration with that, it’s a stickier concept. I put that in my first book, that concept, about how we can have a conscious intention. You can consciously say, “I want to go on a diet,” but the subconscious mind might say, “No way, pal. Not without beer or pizza, I’m not.” It might have all these reasons why not that are unconscious.

Consciously, in the parable in the book, the ant says, “I want to go west,” but it’s on the back of the elephant. It doesn’t see the elephant. If you’re an ant on the back of the elephant, you’re not seeing an elephant. You see just a gray landscape. It’s the same deal with our subconscious mind. We can’t possibly comprehend the power, the immense direction and agenda of the subconscious mind. In the same breath, what if we had alignment between your conscious intention and your subconscious agenda? The book, The Ant and the Elephant, is about creating the alignment of where you want to go with your life first. Where is it that you want to go? Identify that with what I call the elephant buzz, that thought that creates a physical reaction and then being able to get your subconscious mind to step in line. There is a technique and that’s how I got to the Olympics in speed skiing. I end up skiing 135 miles an hour not because I wanted to, but I wanted to go to the Olympic Games. That emotional buzz, the elephant buzz of marching in the opening ceremonies. First you identify it, which I did and then I went, “How are we going to get there?” Aligning your ant and elephant is critical and then it gets easier. What if life got easier?

You said, “Where you want to go?” but a lot of where we want to go is impacted by our environment of what people have told us we should do or what we thought was boring, maybe we wouldn’t find boring. It’s impacted by our teachers when we’re in school or friends. How do you get over that to open up your mind to be more curious and successful?

Without experience, we don’t have the confidence.CLICK TO TWEET

I split it into five C’s and let me go through this real quick because that will answer your question in the broadest sense. When you clarify where you want to go with that emotional buzz, you’re then going towards the second C which is commitment. Stepping towards something, you can be held back by all sorts of things that you are scared of, childhood wounds, limiting beliefs or all those subconscious things that exist. The commitment is less about a moment. Every Saturday, couples walk down the aisle and commit. That’s a moment in time. Commitment is a process. You have to step in and consistently step forward. Another way to put it, I call it the Mathematics of Opportunity. You go into a hallway where you are in your life and you see a door. Open the door and then look for another door. Open that door. Stay curious and that feeds into the process of commitment. The third C is consistency and then you’re in this process of consistency where you’re consistently executing. While I was racing, the philosophy was to do what the competition is not willing to do.

If you want to know what your competition is not willing to do, it’s typically those are the things you’re not willing to do either. To look in the self-honesty mirror and say, “What are the things that the top, the highest performers are not willing to do?” I say the highest performers because this is back to the Olympic story. In order to qualify for the Olympic team, you have to be ranked top sixteen in the world or higher, at least where I’m from in Canada or the United States for that matter. What are those top sixteen guys in the world not willing to do? It changes the dynamic of what you do consistently from the heroes in business, the heroes in sport. The heroes in leadership are the ones that are working harder and the first one in the office and the last one at night. These are the people that we look up to that are working hard. Work smarter. The Olympic motto is, “Citius, Altius, Fortius,” which is, “Swifter, Higher, Stronger.” How about adding a fourth one which is Smartius? Why not be smarter in how you approach this? That’s under the banner of consistency. Consistently executing, consistently innovating, consistently doing things the competition is not willing to do.

The fourth C is confidence. You can draw a direct line from confidence to outcomes. If somebody has high confidence, they’ll have peak performance or their performance will be higher and then you’re going to have better outcomes. What we consistently do is we always focus on, “I don’t have the results that I need. I need to change my performance. I need to do things differently.” That’s the case, but go further back and go, “What is my level of confidence?” If confidence is high and fear is low, you’re going to naturally have a better performance. Better on a sale or negotiation or speech you’re giving. For the leaders reading and the people you’re talking to and trying to get them going the same direction. If you have high confidence, you have better outcomes. That’s the fourth C.

The fifth C is control. Control is an odd word. Give me the long list of things you can control in your life. It doesn’t exist. You can control what you bring to the environment, meaning you can control what you bring to a meeting. You can control what you bring to a conversation with a teenager. You can control routines. The routines that I had when I was an athlete, I do the same thing prior to every keynote speech, that motivational talk I give, the exact same things. You get there early. I visualize the outcomes. I use something called the Vortex Technique where I get the highest and best energy and then I make the decision to have fun. I was preparing for our interview and I was going, “I want to talk about this,” and I was focusing on this. I went through these notes and then I went, “Wait, have fun.” Have you ever had a speaker you get the impression they’re saying, “Take my advice, I’m not using it.”

You brought up a couple of things that are important to my research. I was talking about how we have environment or assumptions. You also brought up fear. I came up with four factors that affect curiosity and fear, assumptions, technology and environment are the four that I found. Fear is such a huge thing. You talk about fear of opening the door or whatever. How do we get that high level of confidence? How do you overcome that fear?

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That’s huge and it’s only getting bigger. The reason we have so much dysfunction in our world now is a confluence of speed, the volume of things coming at us and at the same thing with that volume is being able to say, “What could happen? The fear attached to that.” Confidence is very much attached to experience, but we don’t have the experience with the new marketplace or a new landscape that we find ourselves in. Political, interpersonal, everything’s changed. Without that experience, how do you have confidence? If you don’t have confidence, you don’t have peak performance and you have the outcomes that you’re unhappy with. Here we are in an insidious direct line to outcomes that aren’t optimal. Go back to the clarity and find out where is it you want to hit? What is true north for you? We don’t know how we’re going to get there. If you’re clear on that emotional buzz of that outcome you’d like to have, is it the family together in a family reunion? Is it a situation in the marching of the opening ceremonies? Maybe I set a goal of having a New York Times bestselling book, I said, “How cool would that be? I don’t know how to get there.” To be able to create confidence, one tool that I wrote in the book, The Ant and the Elephant, is the ant has a conversation with the elephant.

Your conscious mind has a conversation with your subconscious mind only when it triggers with a negative thought. A negative thought is anything that takes you off course from the clarity, that outcome you’re headed towards. Let’s say a leader wants to be able to have a launch of a new product that is going to be in the media and everybody’s going to be talking about it. Everybody’s going to be excited and it’s going to be the new new thing. Let’s say a thought comes up and says, “We don’t have the budget for that.” The conscious mind says to the subconscious mind, “Thank you, but that’s not part of my vision. My vision is,” and then you go back to the exact scenario that you painted in the first place. How cool would it be? The launch, the media attention, the new new thing. You’ve interrupted the negative thought, the fear and then pivoted onto the emotional buzz. Every time you pivot onto an emotional buzz means that you have aligned 2,000 neurons and four billion neurons at the exact same time. The physical reaction from a thought is a litmus test for your ant and elephant headed in the same direction. The more you keep those four billion neurons aligned with your conscious intention, the easier things will be and the more things will manifest and appear. They show up. Somebody gives you a phone call and makes it happen. It works out that way.

How do you use that to become a New York Times bestselling author? How do you get there?

It’s very much a process. When I set out to be a New York Times bestselling author, it would have been my fourth book I was working on. I laid it out on the table and said, “This is the goal. This is the objective,” and I’ve brought people in who are way smarter than me which isn’t that tough. I have skied at 135 miles an hour. Let’s put that in perspective. I got the marketing team and they said, “You raced in the Olympics at 135 so speed is your thing.” We started with the speed concept and said, “If the speed’s the thing, what’s society dealing with right now? Society is in overwhelm. Why don’t I write a book called The Age of Speed?”

I brought in my publisher then I brought in a publicist who’d worked with John Maxwell and Marcus Buckingham and big authors like that. I worked over with a publisher who probably in the last few years had about fifteen New York Times bestselling books. I assembled this dream team and not because I knew that I should upfront. I said, “If we got the concept, we got The Age of Speed, we got the publicist, what’s next?” I know a guy and it’s like, “Boom.” Things in motion tend to stay in motion. Why don’t you be the architect for the direction of that motion? Most people aren’t.

Clearly define what the big puzzle piece looks like, smells like and tastes like. When I talk about a direction you’re headed, when I say clarity of vision, I wish I never said that in the book. It’s more than a vision. You’ve got to smell it and taste it. You got to bring in the five senses and then the emotion attached to that. That’s something I’ve come up within the last few years. I call experiencialization. Experience it. Experience the entire physiological. The smell, the taste, the touch and then the emotion attached to that. That makes it clear to the subconscious mind, the elephant, where it is you want to go. If you’ve got four billion neurons working in the same direction as your 2,000 neurons every second, who are you to say, “How do I do that New York Times bestselling book?” Get out of the way. Be in that state and that direction. Thank you, that’s not part of my vision. Pivot and then you go back onto what that outcome is. It’s less about what you do and more about the state you’re in and then people follow you. People follow people who have a passion for where they’re headed. Look at the political races. Look at the debates that are happening. The people who are most passionate about where they’re headed are the ones who are most appealing.

That’s an interesting aspect of what you were talking about. You have a lot of passion for what you do. Your prior background was a VP of Marketing International Investment Properties. You had this award-winning sales career. I’ve been in sales for many years and different aspects. How much is that foundational to your success to have a sales background do you think?

The more you keep those four billion neurons aligned with your conscious intention, the easier things will be.CLICK TO TWEET

I’ve got three kids. They’re now 21, twenty and eighteen. From day one, my wife’s an entrepreneur. I’m an entrepreneur. We knew that they will succeed based on how well they communicate. There’s a saying, “If your lips are moving, chances are you’re selling something.” Connect the dots and say, “How well can you communicate? How confident can you be?” All three are extraordinary. The oldest is at Berklee College of Music. He’s dropping an album. We don’t finance any of what they do, by the way. It would be easy for us to write a check and say, “We got your back,” but my son, example, wanted to release an album. He has to hustle. He went to these top studios. One in Seattle, one in Dallas and one in Boston. Each of these places he was going to school at and he said to the studio owners, “I got this job at this hotel where I’ve got the midnight shift. At the end of this week, I’m going to make $400. If I give you $390 and I keep $10 for food, would you?” These studio owners knowing in the back of their mind they charge about $10,000 a day. They’ve got a 21-year-old so passionate and so specific on what he wants to create and then he’s making it happen. You do have to lead by example. We each knew. Do what you want. I know in my life that I have to lead by example. If I lead in a way that has people go, “That’s the way we’re going to make it happen.” Our middle child, she’s at Wharton School of Business. She went to an arts magnet school. She wasn’t your prototypical Wharton-type kid, but she gets after it. The reason she beat out 39,000 other kids is that she was deliberate on where she wanted to end up and had an emotional buzz attached to that. The youngest is a dancer.

That’s amazing that your kids do such interesting things. You do a lot of interesting things. I was in a rock-climbing competition and I found that you’re the Founder of the Heroes Climb Initiative, climbing and naming mountains after everyday heroes. You’ve participated in six Himalayan expeditions. You’re super athletic in all aspects.

Yes and no, but I’m more curious. If you looked at me, “You look like a chunky version of Anderson Cooper. You don’t exactly look like an athlete,” but I play beer league hockey. You’ve brought up all these things and I sound like an overachiever. I’m more curious. Everybody thinks about what I do. I don’t do it for the accolades. I put it on the bio so people can feel good about hiring me as a speaker. Make it about your audience. What are you going to do to create that emotional buzz? What are you going to do to commit and step up? What are you going to do consistently? How can we break it down and make it happen? Your podcast, your radio show, you have such an opportunity to reach out to people and truly transform people by the people you interview. That’s extraordinary, the privilege you and I have to get out there.

That’s probably a lot of my goal with this. You talk about emotional buzz. My dissertation was in emotional intelligence. I’m fascinated by how much emotions and all the things that we learned just being in sales like you were. We have a lot of similar background things. I’ve never been to the Olympics to that extent, but the sales background and some of the stuff that we have in common. We learned a lot about the lack of some of the emotional intelligence that was out there, at least I did. I was a pharmaceutical rep and saw a lot of doctors. It’s interesting to see all this training. Are you seeing people improving? What has been your experience? You’ve had some of the hugest clients. Your list is a who’s who of who you’d want to have to consult and speak to in the world. Are you seeing that we’re getting better at our emotional intelligence, our interpersonal skills and all the things that fall into the soft skills area? What are you seeing?

I see us getting worse on one level and it’s affecting everything. It’s this absolute determination to be right. The people are jumping up and down and sticking their feet in the ground and saying, “This is the way it has to be.” That is a lack of emotional intelligence. That is a lack of empathy. It’s creating a conversation. In one breadth I see things getting better. I don’t know if it’s just the kids I’m seeing around me. I speak to some youth groups at times. I am so optimistic about the future. I see so many aware people out there that the default to say, “What’s wrong with Millennials or what’s wrong with Generation Z?” This optimum comes from the awareness that people are going, “What if I’m not right? What if you have a point of view?” We had this little aside. When we’re doing this interview, the midterm elections in the US are coming up here in the next few weeks. We decided to watch one of the big debates between Ted Cruz and Beto O’Rourke.

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We had a drinking game attached to it. What we did was every time Cruz said, “Hillary Clinton,” we’d have to drink a beer. Every time Beto does say, “I’ve been to 254 counties in Texas,” you’d have to slug a beer. The reason I bring that up is we created an environment to have a conversation. We paused the TV and then we talked about something. We had Republicans and Democrats in the room and people and kids. Not from Canada, but what am I. I’m not either. I just moved here. I don’t have a predisposed political party that I have to be a part of. To create that dialogue, to put yourself in an environment where people are talking and being aware. Three of the people in the room were under 25. Part of their discussion was enlightening. To shift from being right to shift to having a conversation, just communicate is critical.

Creating a dialogue is important and that’s what I’m trying to do with my work. A lot of what you do is important. Your books have been unbelievable. I’m looking forward to the next one. I’m wondering if it’s going to entail that word that you created.

Experiencialization.

It was wonderful having you on the show. A lot of people are going to want to know how they can get your books or find out more to have you speak and all that. Vince, could you share that?

My website VincePoscente.com will get you there. You can go to AntAndElephant.com and you’ll be able to find me that way too.

One way or another, hopefully, they’ll find your work. It was nice having you on, Vince. Thank you so much for doing the show.

If your lips are moving, chances are you're selling something.CLICK TO TWEET

You’re a true pro. Keep it up.

Tags: Business Leadership, Team Building, Self Development, Motivational, Goals

How to Make Your Brain Work for You

Posted by Vince Poscente on Wed, Sep 12, 2018 @ 06:29 PM

HOW YOUR MIND WORKS
Your brain is a complex and powerful tool. To best explore the potential of your brain, let’s first study its evolution, properties and characteristics.

YOUR BRAIN
As far as evolutionary scientists know, the human brain evolved in three main stages. First, the Reptilian brain, at the innermost core, is the most ancient and primitive. It is located at the brainstem, near the top of your neck. It controls many of your body’s instinctive functions, such as breath- ing. Next evolved the Mammalian brain with new functions and ways to control the body. It also controls your emotions, your sexuality and is a key component to memory. Then evolved the neocortex, the gray matter, as the third part of the brain. You use this portion for talking, seeing, hearing, thinking and creating. This “human” brain is the bulk of the whole and has two symmetrical hemispheres which communicate. These three brains interconnect and determine human behavior.

The left and right hemispheres are often talked about, though not always understood. The detail-oriented, verbal and sorting side of the brain is on the left. The intuitive, spatial, non-verbal side of the brain is the right. To best remember this, learn that left is logical and right is creative. Both sides are connected by the corpus callosum and this is the actual pathway or switching system for information exchange between the two hemispheres. When these different aspects of the brain integrate, learning is much more profound.

Within the brain there are six intelligence centers, each having different functions and interrelating in thousands of ways on a constant basis.
1. The Prefrontal Cortex: thinking
2. The Motor Cortex: activity
3. The Temporal Cortex: speech center
4. The Parietal Lobe: spatial ability
5. The Occipital Lobe: visual center
6. The Cerebellum: “little brain,” balance and posture (handy when learning a skill like riding a bicycle or playing a musical instrument)

Finally, there are three key relay points that are often referred to as the three gatekeepers.

  1. The Amygdala: relays the instinctual fight-or-flight reaction to various parts and organs in the body.
  2. The Hippocampus: relays information to other parts of the brain
  3. The Caudate Nucleus: also a relay of information to parts of the brain

THE ELECTRICAL INFORMATION NETWORK BETWEEN YOUR EARS

At birth we are born with between 100 and 120 billion glial (the Greek word for glue) cells or active neurons in the brain. In fact, you could put thirty thousand neurons on the head of a pin, and they would not touch. Around the turn of the twentieth century, William James discovered that we lose the use of roughly 90 percent of our active neurons. This natural process, called pruning, actually strengthens the neuronal connections by reducing the interference and leaves us with 10 billion neurons, a number more than sufficient. This fact is responsible for the general consensus that humans only use 10 percent of the brain.

Nature’s way of improving the efficiency of the brain is to refine thought processes. This is the reason for the profound importance of childhood experiences. A majority of the pathways and connections are sculpted in the early years. It is understood that by the age of six much of the way we think and will learn is firmly established.
Each active neuron in the brain has up to twenty thousand different connections (dendrites) with other cells. In his book, The Amazing Brain, Stanford University professor Robert Ornstein says that the number of connections is probably more than the number of atoms in the universe. I repeat, more than the number of atoms in the universe. Sound incredible?

Think of it this way (as described in the book The Learning Revolution, by Gordon Dryden and Dr. Jeannette Vos):

Consider what happens if you took only ten everyday items—like the first ten things you did this morning—and combined them in every pos- sible sequence. The result would be 3,628,800 different combinations. Take eleven items, connect them, and the number combinations is (ten- fold) 39,916,800! So now try combining 10 billion cells in every possible way—when each one can make up to 20,000 different connections—and you get some idea of the creative capacity of your own brain.

THE ANT AND THE ELEPHANT

Elephant Power Image.jpgYou have one mind, but it is separated into two distinct functions—the objective and the subjective mind. In other words, the conscious and the subconscious act as the waking and the sleeping mind, the voluntary and the involuntary mind, respectively.

The primary use of the conscious mind is what you currently, logically embrace as your thinking mind. The subconscious is actually the engine, drive train and central computer system running the whole thing. Moreover, the conscious mind knows what is real and what is not. The sub- conscious mind, on the other hand, takes in information as fact. It does not know the difference between real and surreal.

Research by Dr. Lee Pulos from Vancouver, Canada, has uncovered that in one second the subconscious mind uses 4 billion neurons all at once. In that same second the conscious mind uses a paltry two thousand neurons. That is a massive difference.

Imagine a tiny fire ant on the back of an African elephant. The ant would be the conscious mind. The elephant would be the subconscious mind. As you read this book, you are reading these words with your conscious mind. You are processing the meaning and storing it with your conscious mind directing this informational traffic. Yet your unconscious mind in the very same second is guiding all bodily functions, keeping your balance, monitoring your body temperature, processing things that happened in your life, repairing a bruise, fighting a virus, thinking about tomorrow and the list goes on. If at any given time you think that you are in control, think again.

Let’s say you look in the bathroom mirror and decide (with your conscious mind) to go on a diet. Meanwhile the subconscious mind might be programmed very differently. In fact, you may have a myriad of subconscious reasons why going on a diet is a bad idea.

Think of the ant walking on the back of the elephant. The ant is walking north saying “I am going this way, in the direction of a diet.”

Meanwhile, the subconscious mind (the elephant) is walking south saying, “I don’t think so. I like that food. I’ll start another time. I don’t deserve to feel good about myself. I need to eat to feel better. I can’t control my urges, etc., etc.”

Which way is the ant really going? South!

Here is another example. A sales person decides to make more money. A year later, she looks at her commissions and sees the same production as the last two years. She wonders why. 

Ant = conscious mind

Elephant = subconscious mind

It is likely that she made a conscious decision to make more money. The ant, still on the back of the elephant, walks in the direction of “more money.” Meanwhile the elephant thinks, “Hey, I got into sales because I wanted more free time. By making more money I would have less time with my family. Plus, more money would certainly bring more taxes, problems and decisions. Then there are the negative perceptions around money to contend with. Moreover, I grew up knowing that money is the ‘root of all evil’ and people that have money are ‘filthy rich.’ Oh, and by the way, I’m not worthy of success. So I’ll just stay right where I am and not go the direction the ant is going.”

When you can get the ant and the elephant to go in the same direction, the result is success—success that is often beyond your expectations. In some cases, the subconscious mind knows exactly how to set things right.

There, now you know about that noodle between your ears. What you do with it has everything to do with the choices you make and how you align your subconscious agenda. 

Look to ELEPHantPOWER micro-learning in the column on the right for the way to align your ant and your elephant. 

TEXT 469.557.2727 AND TYPE IN #FREE

YOU WILL GET THE FIRST FEW MODULES FOR FREE.

Tags: Self Development, Business Leadership, Sales

Good + Bad = Sticky Speeches

Posted by Vince Poscente on Thu, Sep 06, 2018 @ 12:25 PM

MDRT POSCENTE blog picCommunication skills (for a motivational keynote speaker or anyone else with a platform to present) stick with your audience when you integrate both the "good cop" AND the "bad cop." This isn't about the threatening our captive audience. Nor is it about coddling them. "Good Cop, Bad Cop Presentation Skills" happen when you're message makes them comfortable AND uncomfortable. People learn best when they're at ease or uneasy.

Obviously, our most profound life-lessons occur when hardship hits. But don't discard the lessons in blissful, joyful, loving and peaceful moments. We're on this planet to learn and grow. If you can optimize learning, whether it is as a corporate speaker, leader, parent or a true friend, then lets make the most of your "sticky" messaging.

The presentation technique involves both discomfort and comfort.

For example, I will regularly challenge my audiences to look in the self-honesty mirror.

"Do you want to know what the competition is not willing to do? Typically, those are the things you're not willing to do either." (discomfort)

Then I follow that with, "I'm not here for you to like me. I said that once and a guy at the back said, We don't." (audience laughs followed by a comedic build...)

"It was Enterprise Fleet Services."

"May."

"2000"

"Huh... easy to let go of stuff." (more laughter)

"Seriously, be honest with yourself. Find ways to do what the competition is not willing to do. Own it."

Another example?

Screen Shot 2018-09-06 at 12.11.04 PM

Tom Peters, author of In Search of Excellence, did a legendary 'bad cop, good cop' poke at the Canadian Postal Service. As the story goes, Peters was called to the stage by his introducer. The curtain did not part. There was instantaneous discomfort. The audience squirmed. The introducer had no back-up plan. The AV team dove for filler music. After an agonizing few minutes, Peters walked out to center stage. The music went down and he opened with, "Based on your standards, I'm on time."

Of course, Peters went on to wow the audience with his direct style and corporate content. But, he wasn't there just for the audience to like him. He was there to deliver a return on investment. In this case, the fee paid to Peters by the Canadian Postal Service.

Double the impact with your messaging with feel good stuff... PLUS, add in some uncomfortable stuff, and your message will truly be sticky.

Author: Vince Poscente. His motivational keynotes help audiences overcome obstacles and maintain resilience, while having fun along the way. He draws from his background as an Olympic Competitor, New York Times Bestselling Author, Hall of Fame Speaker and second chair clarinet player in his high school band.

Tags: Business Leadership, Team Building, Motivational

10 Tips to Procrastinate Later

Posted by Vince Poscente on Wed, Aug 29, 2018 @ 11:46 AM

Challenge your own self-motivation. Take yourself to task on what you could do to raise your own drive to succeed.

With one toe on the side of sarcasm and the other foot planted firmly in You-Best-Pay-Attention; noodle on this saying: "Go Now. Procrastinate Later."

Let's take a deeper look.

Take the iconic Nike slogan “Just Do It” and combine it with the Masaaki Imai's famous corporate rally cry for continuous improvement, 'Kaizen.'

Mr. Imai offers ten basic tips for kaizen activities. Let's combine these with a way to procrastinate later, and you have a way to amp-up your self motivation starting immediately. Think of a project that is weighing on you right now.

Follow these 10 Tips for Self-Motivation

Tip #1: Discard conventional fixed ideas. Move forward to definable goals. Do not focus as much on the path to get there. New opportunities and new directions may occur to you along the way. Raise your gaze.

Tip #2: Think of how to do it, not why it cannot be done. “Realistic” is a dangerous word. Instead, by knowing that the outcome would be desirable, hypothesize methods to accomplish this goal.

Tip #3: Do not make excuses. Start by questioning current practices. Again, focus on the outcome. Excuses will not take you there, but acting on the means to the end will. Do not be afraid to make mistakes. You will learn more by failing.

Tip #4: Do not seek perfection. Do it right away even if for only 50 percent of the target. For example, four months after having the idea to write my first book, it was done. I did not wait to start. I did not wait at each stage. Of course, I wanted the book to be perfect, but that would never be. Along the way, implement tip #5.

Tip #5: If you make a mistake, correct it right away. I saw a bib that says “Spit Happens.” Mistakes happen. High-performing people correct their mistakes immediately, especially when those mistakes involve other people. “Hey, I made a mistake. I have an idea of what we can do about it.”

Tip #6: Do not spend money for kaizen; use your wisdom. How much do you know about the way your car is repaired when you take it to a mechanic? Chances are, nothing! When you seek to personify proactivity for your own pursuits, then you must be proactive. Remember, however, some of the best solutions happen when you pause, stand back and think. “Just Do It” is not about blindly charging ahead. Plan. Take ownership and move yourself through the process.

Tip #7: Wisdom is often born out of people faced with hardship. Welcome problems as opportunities to learn. Think of a hardship that you have experienced in the past. Now ask yourself, would you change anything about that experience? Most often, the answer is “No, otherwise, I wouldn’t have learned what I know now.”

Tip #8: Ask “Why?” five times and seek root causes. Each time you ask why, come up with a new answer. Go deeper with each answer. You will surprise yourself.

Tip #9: Seek the wisdom of ten people rather than the knowledge of one. Remember a person’s perspective is their truth. You will learn ten truths versus just one.

Tip #10: Kaizen ideas are infinite. You never “arrive.” You are in a process of learning and growing. Always seek higher ground.

If you scanned this article and didn't truly reflect on a project you are struggling with... STOP. Take a breath and ruminate on each of the ten tips. Pay special attention to Tip #8.

Stop procrastination at its fear-based source. Go now!

PS Even motivational keynote speakers need self-motivation. I wrote this blog for me as much as you. I wrote it now, because later is too late. :-)

Tags: Business Leadership, Self Development, Motivational, Goals

How the Millennial Bottleneck Can Cost You Business

Posted by Vince Poscente on Thu, Sep 14, 2017 @ 04:31 PM

In the motivational keynote speaker world we often wonder why our quality keynote speaker videos are not getting so-much-as-a first-look. Our well-thought-out speaker submission is not getting through. They "chose a different keynote speaker" or "went a different direction." Does this sound familiar in your business?

What are we missing? It's a recent phenomenon we call the Millennial Bottleneck.

A few factors are at play. In particular, it's human nature to follow the crowd. 70% of buyers seek other's opinions before buying. BUT, get this... the percentage jumps to 82% with Millennials seeking social proof.

Like you, we're not new to our industry, yet a bottleneck that USED to be focused strictly on quality is now turning it's eyeballs to social evidence first. And those "eyeballs" (at the 'gate-keeper' phase), we're finding, are predominantly owned by Millennials.

To get a 30,000 foot view, here is what the our speaker bureau agents' booking sequence generally looks like today:

Millennial bottleneck.jpg

What can you do to get more business?

#1: Beef Up Your Social Media Image (especially LinkedIn and whatever appears on the first page when they search you). When you Google your name and company are you looking at the first page from the eyes of a Millennial?

#2: A Killer 1st Impression. Be sure your product or service (in our case, a business keynote) you suggested has equally good social proof. Click here for and example of what we do. 

#3: Send Your Client Social Proof. Give Millennials what they want to get past the bottleneck and into the hands of the committee. (By the way, the committee wants both social proof AND quality motivational keynote speaker suggestions.)

45 sec video eg. Popular with our clients.

Video Banner for Testimonial .jpg
Look through the Millennial lens and reduce the amount of business you lose.

Tags: Sales, Business Leadership

5 Qualities of a Heroic Leader

Posted by Vince Poscente on Wed, Feb 15, 2017 @ 03:12 AM

Have you noticed people are increasingly uncertain about the future? This visceral doubt sparks fear. Here's the antidote to this pervasive type of fear:

The Heroic Leader

Hero.jpgIf you are in a leadership position, simply stating your vision of the future is not enough. (psst... if your lips are moving, you're in a position of leadership ;-)

There are five, essential character traits that will make your words resonate and generate much-needed optimism.

These same traits are abundant in everyday heroes.

Heroic Leaders are:

  1. Compassionate - They have a level of empathy that supersedes ego. Leaders without ego can see past themselves to the people they serve. Not convinced? Imagine a leader without compassion. Imagine a leader with attributes of hate, meanness, callousness or ruthlessness. Be compassionate!
  2. FearlessIt is impossible for us mere mortals to have zero fear. But, a hero finds a way to fear less. Leaders who understand fear is not a long term motivator can engage sustained loyalty. How? Better than comments that instill fear, point out the dysfunction followed by a loving solution (see compassion). Fear less!
  3. Humble - There is a magnetism to humility. Heroes in our world never self-identify as heroes. They simply acted our of an ego-less, natural instinct. "It was the right thing to do." True, magnetic leaders don't DO humble. They ARE humble. Their innate mantra is, "It's not about me. It's about the people I serve." Be humble!
  4. Selfless - Heroes who fear less, are compassionate and humble are naturally selfless. Leaders who are self indulgent or selfish can find themselves alone on the front line. Think more about others. In turn, they will join you. Be selfless!
  5. Persistent - Heroes never give up. Persistent leaders will gather an army of believers. Persist, persist, persist!

Each of us embody some of these heroic character traits, but we can always improve in all of them. Challenge yourself to be more compassionate, fearless, humble, selfless and persistent.

Do this and fear will dissipate while a clear, bright future will unfold.

*************************************

 

About the Author:

Vince Poscente helps audiences overcome obstacles and sustain resiliency.

In 2017 he's among the 10 Highest Rated Inspirational Speakers for Business. 

www.Goals-Fast.com

Tags: Business Leadership, Changing Times, Team Building, Goals

Top 5 Most Stressful Jobs? Event Planners Make the List

Posted by Vince Poscente on Wed, Mar 09, 2016 @ 03:00 AM

 For a motivational keynote speaker of 20 years, there is very little stress associated with that one hour on stage. But for event coordinators, the mismanaged stress can be all consuming. Persistent, on-the-job stress can manifest into a cadre physical and mental issues. Event planners, you earned every gray hair on your stress-for-success head.

Kelly_and_Patricia.jpg

"What stress? They hired pros." Madison Advisors 2016 CCM Roundtable Event Organizers - Kelly Dittrich & Patricia Kilgore

Each of us can readily empathize how serving in the military, police force, fighting fires or flying a plane can be stressful, but you don't truly know how stressful planning an event can be until you've walked a mile of convention center corridors in their shoes.

How hard could it be? Fourteen years ago, the echoes of the stress organizing a surprise birthday party still linger in the dark shadows of my psyche.

The surprise? A fake funeral as my wife's 40th birthday party. The idea (admittedly, not a great one) involved:

  • Invitations sent out as a replica of an obituary in the newspaper.
  • The guest of honor, Michelle, enters and is immediately ushered down the aisle atop a chaise lounge; carried by 6 pallbearers.
  • The event would be hosted by a Professional MC.
  • The eulogies would be given by friends and relatives based on a specific agenda.
  • Between each eulogy, video messages would play from people who couldn't make the Dallas event.
  • A mixer would conclude the event with food and drink.

After just one event, I swore I would:

  1. Appreciate every single event planner I ever met in my keynote speaking career.
  2. Never, ever plan another event unless I hired professionals.
  3. Did I mention, never plan an event without professionals?

The professional MC, Dale Irvin, did a masterful job. He was funny, on point, did a hysterical opening, moved the eulogists along and rolled with any issue that came up. Outside of that, there were PLENTY of issues. The eight guest presenters did a fine job, but organizing them, covering for those who didn't show up as promised, shifting the schedule around for others who wanted to speak at a different time, nudging the amateur-hour-going-long, adding last minute audio/visual handed to me minutes before they were to speak.... Then there was the technology! Making sure the videos played with the right sound and timing. NEVER AGAIN... without professionals.

Event Planners - you have chosen a profession where perfection seems to be your client's minimum expectation. Anything that goes wrong, gets noticed. And in today's world where someone has to take the fall. Tag, you're it. 

If you know, or work with an event coordinator - be kind to them. Give them hugs. Buy them each a massage following the meeting. 

If you are an event planner - be kind to yourself, go get hugs from your adoring fans, get that massage after your event. You picked a rewarding profession with the prospect of a thorny path. 

Oh, and as for organizing a funeral for your wife (in place of a real birthday party...), let's just say, Michelle has a sense of humor but I'll never do that again either.  

Tags: Business Leadership

Is Technology Messing with Your Integrity?

Posted by Vince Poscente on Wed, Nov 04, 2015 @ 03:00 AM

Are you having to endure an increase in canceled phone calls, lunch meetings and appointments? Is society's level of integrity (keeping one's word) devolving into a quagmire of "Something came up and it's more important than you," or is there a mechanism triggering an unsettling trend of cancellations and rescheduling?

It is happening multiple times a week. Clients, suppliers, prospects, friends and colleagues are canceling our set 'appointment' at a disturbing rate. Regarding appointments, there is distinct shift from, "My word is my bond" to "My word is a approximation of a bond I may or may not honor due to unforeseen circumstances."

Excuses are on the uptick as well. These excuses have no set pattern. Our morning meeting ran long. My client called with an emergency and we had to address that first. There was a last minute trip to Chicago to meet a prospect. I didn't expect the vehicle inspection to take two hours.

To understand Cancelmageddon, let's start at the end and work backwards.

4th - When a person cancels or asks to reschedule he basically sends the clear, yet unspoken, message, "Something more important than you came up."

3rd - That person was forced to choose between his appointment and something unexpected.

2nd - The unexpected is often precipitated by either:

  • An overly optimistic sequence of appointments
  • A lack of contingency
  • Unfettered access to each of us through mobile technology

1st - That person plugged appointments in a calendar turning a blind-eye' to the fallout from 2nd, 3rd or 4th above.

How is this happening more today, than ever before? Technology has allowed us to fit more into a day. Efficacy has run amok.

To spell this out in the simplest yet broadest terms, let's use the following Before & After Surge in Technological Innovation scenario as an example:

Get more done in a day, at a cost.

What took an hour to do in the past, now takes minutes. Instead of enjoying all the discretionary time, we fit more in. Why, because we each LOVE to get more done. Instead of one thing accomplished in an hour, let's say we have six things we can now accomplish. In days gone by, one task had a chance of unexpected consequences. Now, we have six tasks with unforeseen results. The shift from 1x to 6x raises the odds of an unpredicted choice by 600%. We are only human. Plans change. Odds are, with technology doing what it is supposed to do, each of us is facing an unfortunate message we are receiving and sending, 

"Something came up and it is more important than you."

Is technology messing with your integrity? Yes... but... don't blame technology, use it.

Start at the end and work your way backwards. Use technology and your intention to:

  1. Send a Clear Message - "You are the most important person" (Especially at 2 pm on Wednesday.)
  2. Eliminate the Chance of Choice - Communicate early and often about the commitments you have made. You always have a choice. People will respect you more when you keep your word.
  3. Always Build-In Contingencies - As a guideline, put a half an hour buffer between calls. One hour on either side of meetings and at least two hours surrounding uncertain activities. Put non-appointment activities (emails, tasks, flexible activities) in the buffer zones.
  4. Direct Your Attention to Possible Fall-Out. For each appointment, quickly imagine three scenarios which could mess with your plans. In turn, plan accordingly for fall-out.

Use technology to your advantage. Turn the tides of (perceived) disintegrating integrity.

Your word is your reputation. 

Tags: Self Development, Motivational, Business Leadership

What if Uber and Walmart had a Baby?

Posted by Vince Poscente on Wed, Oct 28, 2015 @ 03:00 AM

"What if Uber and Walmart had a baby?"

Now that's a subject line that would entice you to read an email (see below for the answer).

But what if your subject line reads like this:

"Follow up to our conversation"

eeechhh, blahhh, grrrrgh, bleeeesch.

What does it take to write a good subject line? Simple. Your noggin.

By putting some of your creative brain-power into your subject lines, you will have more impact and influence. Here are 5 Must Do's for Email Subject Lines:

1st. STOP putting Features before Benefits. If you send a regular/weekly email - stop making the first few words the feature "Weekly Report," for example. Start with the benefit:

  • ie. 3 Mistakes New Moms Make (then insert the feature): Weekly Report.
  • If you are sending a 'one-off' email. The same rule applies. Put a benefit into the subject line.
  • Instead of "Next meeting," consider putting, "You're going to love our next meeting." 

2nd. START with a Domino. You want the subject line to domino into the next domino (being the body of the email).

  • The first line of the body should 'domino' into the next line. And so on. 

3rd SUMMARIZE your Message (when possible). If you're emailing to set up a meeting, then put the summary in the subject line.

  • "Leaders meet 10.01.16 @ 3 pm Boardroom" is more efficient and effective than...
  • "meeting conversation"
  • Be a hero and save your recipients time.

4th CHANGE the Forwarded Subject Lines. You can be the light in the dark abyss of the emails. Use discretion for work flow purposes, of course. BUT, the fearless subject-line-changer is to be revered.  

  • "Meeting is 01.25.16 @ 9 am Starbucks on Alpha" = good.
  • "Fwd. Fwd. idea" = bad.

5th HAVE FUN with your Subject Line. Inspiration can come from:

  • A play on words. eg. Announcement in our Bored Room.  
  • A counter intuitive statement. eg. If at first you don't fail...
  • A exaggerated benefit eg. Even Martians like our product launch

What does the subject line of this 70 Second eBrief mean in this email?

What if Uber and Walmart had a baby? Put it this way:

Uber is, "We're there when your friends aren't"  

+

Walmart is, "People-Watch while you Save money. Live better."

For you, this is what our weekly, motivational 70 second eBrief is meant to be:

  • Save money (and time).
  • Live better (feel better, have more fun, think better).
  • Be a friend to get you where you want to go. (People watching optional)

Tags: Sales, Motivational, Business Leadership

From Self Doubt to Greatness - Fast

Posted by Vince Poscente on Wed, Oct 07, 2015 @ 03:00 AM

No matter how much we invest in ourselves, we always have some measure of self-doubt. How does one say goodbye to the negative voice sitting on our right shoulder? Well, we couldn’t think of anyone better to guide us, than Vince Poscente, the internationally acclaimed keynote speaker, founder of The Goal Acceleration Institute, and author of two of our favorite books: The Ant and the Elephant and The Age of Speed. His specialty? Helping people achieve big goals in less time.

We would like to share with you an interview between getAbstract and Vince Poscente.

gA: How would you describe the two books of yours that we’ve created summaries of for getAbstract?

VP: Well, The Ant and the Elephant is a personal development book, told in parable format; the ant being the metaphor for the conscious mind, and the elephant for the subconscious. The theory is that when you align your ant and your elephant then things get easier and more fun; in other words, it's less arduous to get to where you want to go. And then The Age of Speed is more of a concept book about the world we live in, and how we can thrive in a fast-paced world without feeling like we're overwhelmed.

gA: Thanks! OK, so tell us, how do we conquer that little voice of doubt? The naysayer that sits on our shoulder?

VP: First off, give him or her an identity – for me he's short and green – and then accept that the voice of doubt is completely natural and there must be a reason why the subconscious mind serves it to us. Simply acknowledge that the voice of doubt is there, and to talk back to it. Say “Thank you for your opinion but that's not part of my vision. My vision is [insert your elephant (i.e. emotional) buzz here] because that’s what will get me to the endpoint I desire.”

Want to help your employees move past self-doubt and on to greatness? Please let me know and I will customize the flyer below containing Vince’s titles in addition to a selection our getAbstract’s most popular motivational summaries.

(Above was value add sent by getAbstract to their individual clients. Should you wish to save time and stay current on the latest business books, check out www.getAbstract.com

 

 

 

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Tags: Business Leadership